The University of Maryland Center for Machine Learning continues its Rising Stars in Machine Learning program on Monday, Sept. 30 with an hour-long talk on "Learning with Deep Probabilistic Generative Models.”. [4], Dieng has authored/co-authored several papers published in AI venues such as NeurIPS, ICML, ICLR, AISTATS, and TACL. Adji Bousso Dieng will be Princeton’s School of Engineering’s first Black female faculty. It is for this reason, Rexford said, that faculty demographics change slowly. [5], In 2021, Dieng will join the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University as a tenure-track Assistant Professor. In 2021, she will start her tenure-track faculty position at Princeton University becoming the first Black female faculty member in the School of Engineering and Applied Science as well as the first Black faculty member ever in the Department of Computer Science. [2] She received a scholarship to study abroad after winning this competition. Verified email at columbia.edu - Homepage. Come next September, Adji Bousso Dieng — an expert in artificial intelligence and machine learning — will join the faculty of the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) as a tenure-track assistant professor, becoming the first Black female faculty member in the history of SEAS and the first Black faculty member ever in the Department of Computer Science (COS). Jennifer Rexford ’91, chair of the computer science department, said that she looks forward to welcoming Dieng — a “fantastic scholar and colleague” — to the department. Dieng is supported by a Dean Fellowship from Columbia University. “So you have to come up with a good story for how the data you observe were to come about. “But sometimes it just hits you that you are the only Black person in the room, and that’s when things become challenging emotionally,” she said. “Being the ‘first Black woman’ to do anything is a huge accomplishment, but it can also be a burdensome responsibility, and I hope she knows that I, for one, am highly grateful for her choice to take the leap in spite of that.”. [2] Dieng was one of 15 siblings, and to support the family, her parents owned a business selling fabric. Born and raised in Kaolack, a region in western Senegal, Dieng won a competition in high school hosted by the Pathfinder Foundation for Education and Development and the Central Bank for West African States. Per the statistics provided by the Department of Computer Science, the department retains 58 faculty members, including 45 tenure-track faculty and 13 lecturers. Adji Bousso Dieng will be Princeton’s School of Engineering’s first Black female faculty. Artificial Intelligence (AI) researcher Adji Bousso Dieng will become the first black woman faculty to join Princeton’s School of Engineering in its 100-year history. [3] Her father passed away when she was four years old, yet her mother still ensured that education was a priority in the family. Variational Inference via χ Upper Bound Minimization. Her research bridges probabilistic graphical models and deep learning to discover meaningful structure from unlabelled data. Her research bridges probabilistic graphical models and deep learning to discover meaningful structure from unlabelled data. Though her experience in the COS department has been “generally positive,” Clay-Hubbard said that the underrepresentation of women — particularly Black women — has always been strikingly apparent. Dieng — who revealed that she has never been taught by a Black lecturer since leaving Senegal — said that sometimes she forgets she is the “only one of [her] kind in the classroom.”. Rexford emphasized that the field of computer science must represent the society it serves. According to a 2019 report released by the American Society of Engineering Education, in SEAS as a whole, 36 percent of engineering bachelor’s degrees and 43.5 percent of engineering master’s degrees were awarded to women, ranking the University 15th and 16th in the nation, respectively. Monroy-Hernández is currently a principal researcher at Snap Inc. and an affiliate faculty at the University of Washington. — Adji Bousso Dieng (@adjiboussodieng) August 30, 2020 Speaking by phone from her home in New York, Dieng said her mother had taught her to value education. Dieng’s historic appointment comes as SEAS prepares to mark its centennial anniversary. B. Dieng, C. Wang, J. Gao, and J. W. Paisley. [7] She will be the first Black faculty in Computer Science in Princeton's history, the first Black woman tenure-track faculty in Princeton's School of Engineering, and the second Black woman tenure-track faculty in Computer Science across the Ivy League. From there Dieng joined the World Bank for a year, with the hope she could “positively impact Africa.” She currently works as a researcher at Google, contributing to an undisclosed project in generative modeling. Candidates who receive an offer, however, may ultimately accept a position at another school. B. Dieng, R. Ranganath, J. Altosaar, and D. M. Blei. The slides are available here. But with a dearth of career role models, she had no idea which path to follow. Adji Bousso Dieng is a PhD Candidate at Columbia University where she is jointly advised by David Blei and John Paisley. Come next September, Adji Bousso Dieng — an expert in artificial intelligence and machine learning — will join the faculty of the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) as a tenure-track assistant professor, becoming the first Black female faculty member in the history of SEAS and the first Black faculty member ever in the Department of Computer Science (COS). Block user. “As computer scientists, we have a responsibility to ensure the technology we design is worthy of the trust society increasingly places in it,” she said, adding, “as educators, we have a responsibility to teach our students how to take on this responsibility in their own work.”. Rexford outlined a number of initiatives the department plans to undertake, including creating independent work seminars in support of diversity, developing a Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) plan, supporting student-led projects, establishing a Visiting Scholars Program, incorporating inclusion and diversity materials to departmental-level orientation sessions, and hosting periodic town halls — as well as maintaining existing diversity initiatives. Professor Rory Truex ’07 explained that since the course “includes material that is banned in China,” he didn’t “want anyone to feel that they were in a position where they had to access banned material in order to succeed in my course.”, Nematodes and Reproductive Aging with Nicole Templeman, Amid digital crackdown, Chinese Politics professor recommends students in China avoid his class, Princeton alumna Zoya Shoaib ’20 dies at 22, Sen. Cruz ’92 pushes back after 400 classmates condemn his actions as attempt to “undermine democracy”, Princeton alumni condemn Sen. Ted Cruz ’92, Guttormsen records highest jump ever by Ivy League pole vaulter, eyes Olympics, At least 15 undergraduate courses expected to include in-person components. Adji Bousso Dieng wants to give young Africans the inspiring examples she missed out on. Learn more about blocking users. [9] TAIK inspires young Africans to follow careers in STEM and AI, informs people about the contributions in STEM and AI by Africans, and educates about the rich history of Africa. But with a dearth of career role models, she had no idea which path to follow. CV / Google Scholar / LinkedIn / Github / Twitter / Email: abd2141 at columbia dot edu I am a Ph.D candidate in the department of Statistics at Columbia University where I am jointly being advised by David Blei and John Paisley. [8], Dieng is the founder of the non-profit called “ The Africa I Know”, with the mission to positively change the narrative about Africa and provide opportunities to young Africans. Dieng was also the second black woman to graduate from the department of Statistics at Columbia University. Mais, ce qui fait la particularité de cette native de Kaolack, c’est qu’elle est la première femme She holds a PhD in Statistics from Columbia University where she was advised by David Blei and John Paisley. “It’s sad that people associate diversity with lowering standards when it’s the opposite,” she said. Her research is in Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, bridging probabilistic graphical models and deep learning. Adji Bousso Dieng. B. Dieng, F. J. R. Ruiz, and D. M. Blei. [2] Her father never attended school, and her mother started but did not complete high school. The approach allows researchers to create models and simulations from unlabeled pieces of data, with broad applications in marketing, political science, digital humanities, recommendation systems, and public health. Rexford explained that long-standing hiring and recruitment practices have contributed to the historical and contemporary underrepresentation of minorities in computer science, especially in artificial intelligence. The family business was selling fabric, and neither of her parents finished school. Effective fall 2021, 14 women and two URM faculty members (Dieng and Andrés Monroy-Hernández, both assistant professors) will hold positions in the department. Adji Bousso Dieng. Of those, 13 are women — nine tenure-track faculty and four lecturers — none of whom are URM professors. She received her PhD from Columbia University where she was jointly advised by David Blei and John Paisley. “That said, the scale and scope of the challenge cannot make us complacent.”, In a May interview with the ‘Prince,’ SEAS Dean Andrea Goldsmith, who entered the role earlier this month, said that diversifying the field requires “recognizing that implicit bias plays a big role in discouraging underrepresented groups from pursuing the profession in the first place, and then from staying in it long-term.”. In the wake of a national reckoning with systemic racism, Dieng said she remains optimistic about what the future holds. “That’s the hard work.”. Dieng said that since she announced the news on Twitter, a wide range of students and community members have expressed how much her achievements mean to them. Avoiding Latent Variable Collapse With Generative Skip Models. GROWING up in a trading town in Senegal, Adji Bousso Dieng loved school and had a particular talent for maths. Photo by Louis Reed on Unsplash. Noisin: Unbiased Regularization for Recurrent Neural Networks. [3] The majority of people do not know about the rich history of STEM and AI developments made possible by Africans. [2], While abroad, Dieng attended Lycée Henri IV, a public secondary school located in Paris. Often the only Black woman in a departmental course, Clay-Hubbard said she feels disconnected from her concentration. B. Dieng, Y. Kim, A. M. Rush, and D. M. Blei. “But I do think it’s important to note that one professor certainly isn’t enough. “There are a lot of talented people from underrepresented groups out there who are only waiting to be given a chance.”. B. Dieng, D. Tran, R. Ranganath, J. W. Paisley and D. M. Blei. In 2013, Dieng accepted a position as a Junior Professional Associate at the World Bank working on risk modeling in the Department of Market and Counterparty Risk. Aux Etats-Unis où elle a fini de s’imposer parmi les leaders américains de l’intelligence artificielle, notre compatriote Adji Bousso Dieng est considérée comme un génie des modèles dits génératifs. Bio: Adji Bousso Dieng is a PhD Candidate at Columbia University where she is jointly advised by David Blei and John Paisley. Probabilistic graphical modeling (PGM) provides a framework for formulating an interpretable generative process of data and expressing uncertainty about unknowns. Dieng is supported by a Dean Fellowship from Columbia University. Her research focuses on combining probabilistic graphical modeling and deep learning to design models for structured high-dimensional data. [5] Dieng worked with David Blei and John Paisley to bridge Probabilistic Graphical Modeling and Deep Learning with the goal of discovering meaningful patterns from unlabelled data for applications in natural language processing, computer vision, and healthcare. Thomas Kipf Contact GitHub support about this user’s behavior. My work is about making the process describing the story for the data both flexible and interpretable.”. Adji Bousso Dieng, joins the faculty in fall 2021.. A specialist in artificial intelligence, she holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University, an M.S. Adji Bousso Dieng is currently a Research Scientist at Google AI, and will be starting as an assistant professor at Princeton University in 2021. The University of Maryland Center for Machine Learning invites graduate students and postdocs pursuing academic careers in machine learning to apply to its “Rising Stars in ML” program. Before entering their Arrival Quarantine, undergraduates stopped by Jadwin Gym to submit a saliva sample for COVID-19 testing. Adji gave a talk on April, 28th about her work on TopicRNN and variational inference. “I received many messages from Princeton engineering students telling me how excited they are about my joining the institution. Prevent this user from interacting with your repositories and sending you notifications. [4] She then attended Télécom ParisTech, a top French public institution of higher education and research of engineering located in Palaiseau, France. Not only has Adji Bousso Dieng, an AI researcher from Senegal, contributed to the field of generative modeling and about to become one of the first black female faculty in Computer Science in the Ivy League, she is also helping Africans in STEM tell their own success stories. [2], During high school, Dieng was recognized for her academic achievements. She is currently an Artificial Intelligence Research Scientist at Google Brain in Mountain View, California. Rising Stars in Machine Learning. As campus activists have demanded a more diverse faculty, the University recently outlined a list of “initial priorities” to combat systemic racism on campus, including an institution-wide goal to “increase by 50 percent the number of tenured or tenure-track faculty members from underrepresented groups over the next five years.”, In an email sent out to the computer science community last week, Rexford reaffirmed the department’s commitment to playing a “stronger role in combating racism.”. Adji Bousso Dieng PhD is a Researcher in Artificial Intelligence and Statistics. But with a dearth of career role models, she had no idea which path to follow. [5] She left the World Bank the following summer, in 2014, after being awarded a Columbia University Dean Fellowship to start a PhD in Statistics. For Dieng, becoming an educator was particularly significant, as her father did not attend school and her mother did not complete high school. In this episode of The Highlights, we're joined by Nicole Templeman, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Victoria. [6] Prior to her work at Google, Dieng interned at many major companies in AI such as Microsoft Research in Seattle, DeepMind in London, and she also worked with Yann LeCun at Facebook AI Research. According to Dieng, the negative feedback loop that results from underrepresentation presents as pressing a challenge as do low retention rates. [2] She was also awarded a Master in Applied Statistics from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Adji Bousso Dieng is a PhD Candidate at Columbia University where she is jointly advised by David Blei and John Paisley. After four years there — which included an opportunity to study at Cornell University — Dieng graduated with a dual degree: a Diplôme d’Ingénieur from Telecom ParisTech and a master’s degree in statistics from Cornell. [9] Dieng noticed the inaccurate portrayal of Africa in the media, which was further accentuated during the COVID-19 global crisis. Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics (TACL), 2020, A. Some are even considering switching to computer science,” she said. Block user Report abuse. Dieng was born and raised in Kaolack, Senegal. Adji Bousso Dieng is a Senegalese Computer Scientist and Statistician working in the field of Artificial Intelligence.Her research bridges probabilistic graphical models and deep learning to discover meaningful structure from unlabelled data. TopicRNN: A Recurrent Neural Network with Long Range Semantic Dependency. Adji Bousso Dieng. Adji Bousso Dieng, Dustin Tran, Rajesh Ranganath, John Paisley, David Blei Abstract Variational inference (VI) is widely used as an efficient alternative to Markov chain Monte Carlo. Follow. Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 2019, A. The challenges she’s overcome have not been lost on engineering students at the University. [1] Dieng recently founded the non-profit “The Africa I Know” (TAIK) with the goal to inspire young Africans to pursue careers in STEM and AI by showcasing African role models, informing the general public about developments in STEM and AI by Africans, and educating the general public about the rich history of Africa. … Dieng, Adji Bousso. Dieng attended Kaolack's public schools for both elementary and high school. Research scientist Adji Bousso Dieng, from Senegal, launched the website "The Africa I Know" to highlight experts in STEM in Africa. Her research is in Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, bridging probabilistic graphical models and deep learning. That secured her a €60.000 scholarship to study abroad at Télécom ParisTech in Palaiseau, France. “I hope that Dr. Dieng knows just how much she’s appreciated,” Clay-Hubbard said. [2] She won one of the prizes for the Senegalese Olympiad ("Concours Général") in Philosophy, was selected to participate in the 2005 Excellence camp organized by the Pathfinder Foundation for Education and Development, a non-profit founded by Cheick Modibo Diarra, and was subsequently selected to participate in a competitive exam organized for African girls in partnership between the Central Bank for West African States and the Pathfinder Foundation. Those who do accept an offer may wait before starting their position at the University. Underrepresented minority (URM) students — including Black, Hispanic, and Native American students — comprise between 12 and 14 percent of undergraduate COS majors, in comparison to around 21 percent of the undergraduate population as a whole. Zyanne Clay-Hubbard ’21, a senior COS concentrator, characterized Dieng’s appointment as a “huge milestone,” albeit one that is “wildly overdue.”, “It’s frustrating to think I might not have the chance to take a course with her before I graduate, but I am extremely excited to think of the impact she might have on Black female undergrads in this department and across SEAS in the future,” Clay-Hubbard wrote to the ‘Prince.’ “Just her presence means the world.”. Many academic departments — at the University and elsewhere — hire at most one to two new tenure-track faculty members each year. In 2021, she will start her tenure-track faculty position at Princeton Universitybecoming the first Black female faculty member in the School of Engineering and Applied Science as w… “In some years, a department may need to hire in a particular topic area because of a recent departure or retirement, because of the need to have good ‘coverage’ of the field for both research and teaching,” she said. Dieng, who received a Ph.D. in statistics from Columbia University, is a foremost expert in the generative modeling branch of machine learning. Adji Bousso Dieng will be Princeton's School of Engineering's first Black female faculty. In an interview with … “A big part of the challenge is how much great talent we lose across all stages of the “pipeline” from K-12 through graduate school, due to the inequality and systemic racism in our society,” she added. Columbia University. Dieng spent her third year of Telecom ParisTech's curriculum at Cornell University. Dieng is supported by a Dean Fellowship from Columbia University. International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2018, A. Adji Bousso Dieng is a PhD student at Columbia University, supervised by Prof. David Blei and John Paisley. [3][4] Dieng's doctoral work has received various forms of recognition including the Google PhD Fellowship in Machine Learning[3] and a Rising Star in Machine Learning nomination by the University of Maryland. [THREAD] via @forbes https://t.co/XkWKfbMiak. Growing up in a trading town in Senegal, Adji Bousso Dieng loved school and had a particular talent for maths. Dieng is currently an AI researcher at Google, working in the field of generative modeling. This AI Expert From Senegal Is Helping Showcase Africans In STEM. “Academic institutions have implemented some changes.”, Even so, Dieng maintained that those changes — such as the University removing the name of Woodrow Wilson, Class of 1879, from the School of Public and International Affairs and the American Statistical Association renaming one of its most prestigious awards and lectureships — are “tiny steps.”, “[What] needs to be done is to rethink and redesign our institutions in such a way that people from all walks of life can flourish and achieve their fullest potential,” she said. Growing up in a trading town in Senegal, Adji Bousso Dieng loved school and had a particular talent for maths. Adji Bousso has 9 jobs listed on their profile. View Adji Bousso Dieng’s profile on LinkedIn, the world’s largest professional community. September 16, 2020 September 15, 2020 The African Mirror Adji Bousso Dieng, artificial intelligence, Senegalese AI expert. “Within the academic community, I have seen people waking up to racism, asking for book recommendations, forming study groups around race and racism,” she said. Block or report user Block or report adjidieng. She is currently an Artificial Intelligence Research Scientist at Google Brain in Mountain View, California. Her work bridges probabilistic graphical models and deep learning, both on the modeling and algorithmic fronts. from Cornell University and a … International Conference on learning Representation (ICLR), 2017, A. [10][11] Another goal of the initiative is to provide role models to young Africans, who often grow up without seeing role models that look like them due to a lack of visibility. “Oftentimes people from these groups don’t even apply to things because they don’t see people that look like them in these elite places and they will think it’s because they don’t have the expertise to be hired,” she added. In 2013 she graduated from Télécom ParisTech, earning her Diplome d'ingenieur (a degree in Engineering from France's Grandes Ecoles system). [3], Dieng is currently working at Google Brain as a Research Scientist in Artificial Intelligence (AI). Adji Bousso Dieng adjidieng. Topic Modeling in Embedding Spaces. Her research is in Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, bridging probabilistic graphical models and deep learning. I hope Princeton knows that, and that this is just the beginning of a long, multi-faceted process to make SEAS and all STEM departments more diverse and inclusive,” Clay-Hubbard noted. As of this fall, 40 percent of COS majors at the University are women, making computer science the second most popular major for women on campus, according to data provided to the ‘Prince’ by the Department of Computer Science. “But when I think of the ways I might identify myself as a Princeton student, my department is always last on the list.”, Pushing through the heartbreak and grief to share a milestone: I'll be the first Black woman faculty in @Princeton's School of Engineering in its ~100 years of history and the first Black faculty @PrincetonCS. This makes PGM very useful for understanding phenomena underlying data and for decision making. We discuss her most recent publication and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her lab. Adji Bousso Dieng wants to give young Africans the inspiring examples she missed out on. Adji Bousso Dieng is a PhD Candidate at Columbia University where she is jointly advised by David Blei and John Paisley. Adji Bousso Dieng PhD Candidate at Columbia Greater New York City Area Research 3 people have recommended Adji Bousso Furthermore, 17.4 percent of master’s degrees were awarded to underrepresented minorities. “Also, she is a passionate advocate for diversity, including her work with Women in Machine Learning, Black in AI, the Indaba Deep Learning summer school in Africa, and Latinx outreach.”. Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2017. “She is highly collaborative, so I see her as someone poised to have a broad impact around campus and be a role model to others,” Rexford said. “I love computer science, I enjoy the work I do for class, and I’m excited for the career that I’m starting,” she said. Her research is in Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, bridging probabilistic graphical models and deep learning. [4], After working at the World Bank for one year, Dieng started her PhD in Statistics at Columbia University. Bio: Adji Bousso Dieng is a Senegalese Statistician and Computer Scientist. Her research is in Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, bridging probabilistic graphical models and deep learning. Adji Bousso Dieng is a Senegalese Computer Scientist and Statistician working in the field of Artificial Intelligence. In this episode, Sam Charrington is joined by Adji Bousso Dieng, PhD Student in the Department of Statistics at Columbia University to discuss two of her recent papers, “Noisin: Unbiased Regularization for Recurrent Neural Networks” and TopicRNN: A Recurrent Neural Network with Long-Range Semantic Dependency. “The core idea behind generative modeling is that you can learn everything there is to learn about the data if you learn to simulate data that looks like the data you observe,” she said in an interview with The Daily Princetonian.